Coaching

Finding Your Place in a Volatile World

Humor me. Let’s take a little trip in our minds…

Imagine being on permanent vacation on a lush island in the Pacific somewhere around paradise.

There are people at sea level on the beach and people up at the top of a mountain where you get 360-degree views of everything around. Then there are the people in between who commute from beach to mountain top, ushering others up and down – the docents.

The mountain is steep and rough terrain. The top is paradise – everything you could ever need and want is up there – fresh, drinkable waterfalls, plentiful food, and peace. At the top of the island, they work together to protect and preserve paradise and their abundant lives. They are grateful and they do not take for granted the bounty with which they are bestowed. They are in communion with the land and each other.

It was not easy to get there. They had to find great inner-strength to battle not only physical feats, but also to fight their inner demons. Once they reach the top, they see how worth it was to push through the challenges. Now, looking down the mountain at those attempting to climb up, they wish they could encourage them to believe how worth it is to keep going. They carved a path for others to follow, but it’s more clearly visible from the top, and very hard to find from below. Sometimes they forget just how hard it was and all the times they almost quit.

The people on the beach are grateful, too, but life is harder down there. Every so often a storm or tidal wave comes and wipes out all that they saved in terms of food, which is much more scarce. They have to rebuild their shelter and their spirit.

The docents are people who know where the carved paths are and choose not to stay atop the mountain in paradise, but instead to travel back down to help people up.

You see, the further up you go, the better your perspective. Some docents go all the way down to the beach and are very good at getting the people on the beach to follow them and make it all the way to the top, but most docents only help in getting people a little bit further along. Even then, the people climbing up the mountain are much more inspired to keep going, because they already see that the end of the journey will be worth the effort. Lastly, there are people who are too weak for the trek, people who just believe they are too weak for the trek, and people who do not want to leave their loved ones who are too weak for the trek.

It’s an uncoordinated effort, but if the docents worked together, they could make sure that everyone gets off the beach and up the mountain to where life is better and perspective is stronger. The higher up you go, the better you can see a storm or tidal wave approaching and the safer you are. In fact, science predicts that they are going to become much more frequent.

In a coordinated effort, each docent would train others in multiple paths, and the increased traffic would make the paths wider and easier to transverse. Docents would co-create solutions to get people who are too weak for the trek up the mountain. This would require their time and probably some resources from up above, like food and supplies.

Why do we want to get all the people off of the beach? Because tidal waves are sure to come again. Storms are sure to come again.

In a docent’s journey and mission to help people from the shore reach the mountaintop, it’s common for them to get stuck. Sure, they know the way, but they still face the challenges that continue to exist while ascending the mountain. It’s important to practice self-care and to notice when you are putting yourself at risk of not making it back up the mountain yourself. If you get stuck on the beach trying to get everyone to follow you, it could be hard to tell if you should put yourself at risk for a small crew of willing followers or stay on the beach putting yourself at risk of getting swept away by overwhelm, chaos and change, and not getting back up to safety for yourself.

For docents who find themselves stuck with these challenges of going back down and up, especially on their first few journeys, it is critical to accurately assess your own resilience, stamina, energy, and resources. You may need to get yourself back up the mountain to nourish yourself, allow paradise to raise your vibe, remind you what’s possible, and gain greater perspective again. From there, it would be easier to strategize a path down and back up that requires less effort.

Eventually, with more people going up the mountain, it becomes much easier to convince the people on the beach to start their journey. However, even in the event of a tidal wave or deadly storm, there will be people who will not abandon their home on the beach. Even though life is hard on the beach, it comes with its rewards as well. I mean, it’s still a beach after all.

When you think of this analogy, who are the people on the beach?

What is paradise like?

Who are the people in paradise and what do you think about them?

Who are the docents?

Where are you?

How far up the mountain did you get?

Where do you want to be? Why?

What else can you add to this analogy?

Thanks for playing along. I do hope you share your answers with me.

If you are a docent, we want you in the C3 LinkedIn community. We are building a foundation for a coordinated effort to make the path easier for more people to make it further up the mountain.

Phil Collins – Another Day In Paradise (Official Music Video)

Genesis ‘The Last Domino?’ Tour 2021 tickets on sale now via http://www.genesis-music.com “Another Day In Paradise” was the first single to be released from …

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

2020: The Year of Perfect Hindsight?

If 2020 is the year of perfect hindsight, what has it revealed?

Reflection is an essential part of making conscious decisions and developing as a leader.

The lockdowns during Spring 2020 forced us to reflect, so long as we were able to process the shock and grief.

Prior to COVID, I had grown more and more concerned about the limited bandwidth and increasing responsibility of leaders and how that inhibits leaders’ ability to allocate adequate time for reflection. In 2018, 268 million vacation days went unused in the US! Research cited and promoted by Shawn Achor demonstrates the critical nature of taking vacations for professional growth, as well as the data that proves that companies will enjoy higher productivity and engagement when they encourage employees to use their vacation time.

One of the silver linings of lockdown was finally having this reflection time. For some, it offered grace.

It seems, however, there are some things happening right now are increasingly concerning. Number one is that everything is ramping back up, and companies are forced to play catch-up in order to achieve their annual budgets and maintain their workforce. In comparison to when things were slow, and in addition to the extra responsibilities that many workers are shouldering in terms of childcare limitations and virtual learning, leaders and workers alike are experiencing increasing overwhelming burnout.

For the companies without conscious leadership who failed to address and recognize how the pandemic and civil unrest has been impacting their employees, burnout is most certainly inevitable, if it hasn’t already happened.  Women, in particular, have been leaving the workforce at numbers that signal not only a setback for gender equality, but a sign that we have not come as far as we hoped. This will certainly widen the gender pay gap and leave more women in a position to be dependent on their spouses.

Speaking of civil unrest, 2020 has been an awakening for the country on the prevalence and impacts of systemic racism from our police to our boardrooms.

While the field of human resources has been growing in vigilance against biases, political biases have not only divided Americans further by party, but has also divided families, neighbors, and friends!

The pandemic has made more obvious the disparities between classes and how financially fragile and vulnerable so many Americans are, especially minorities and small business owners.

We have the chance to use the hindsight gained from 2020 and make 2021 the year we bridge our future as a country, as companies, as a community, and as a family. Let’s consider January 2021 as a rebirthday.

Be the bridge!

  • Make sure your company’s leaders are getting adequate time for reflection and employees are taking ample vacation.
  • Evaluate and correct the gender disparities and childcare shortcomings that are impacting families today. Keep in mind that the kids of today become the leaders and solution providers of tomorrow. They need their parents’ time and attention!
  • If you are white, educate yourself about white privilege and fragility. Learn about redlining. Acknowledge and address the real barriers to racial equality in the workforce.
  • Refute your political biases. We cannot unify while we vilify.
  • Support your local businesses as much as you can. Give to your local food banks as much as you can. Check-in on your friends who have been laid off and be proactive in helping them find opportunities!

What other bridges can you build using perfect 2020 hindsight to make sure that we don’t go back to “normal”, but rather move forward toward EPIC.

Epic Careering makes work better for more people. We can support you as a leader to become more influential in building these bridges through the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint.

Branding is the bridge that connects your past and present to your professional future. Is 2021 the year you turn a successful career into a fulfilling legacy? Contact Epic Careering now for a consultation!

Simon & Garfunkel – Bridge Over Troubled Water (Audio)

“Bridge Over Troubled Water” by Simon & Garfunkel Listen to Simon & Garfunkel: https://SimonAndGarfunkel.lnk.to/listenYD Subscribe to the official Simon & Ga…

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Assessments – Answer The Call To Conscious Leadership

It seemed strange at first to carry on with this topic with all that is top of mind to people, but actually, our expert panelist, Al Sullivan, managed to touch upon some advice that every leader needs TODAY to better lead people in these volatile times, and then some!

Go to (or join if you haven’t yet!) the C3 community on LinkedIn to watch the full replay and find out:

  • If you are supposed to answer assessments based on how you currently are or based on future aspirations
  • What it means to be a victim of assessments
  • The best way to leverage assessments as a leader to get the best performance from talent
  • How assessments can help leaders resource people for projects
  • How to decide which assessment to implement
  • If there is an improper application for assessments
  • The most common pitfalls job seekers fall into when using assessments to career plan
  • The significance of impression management
  • Where did these assessments come from and why are they important
  • How assessments work with the 7 steps of organizational development
  • What energy leadership is, and how it’s used to help leaders show up as their best selves, especially now in these volatile times
  • How assessments can be used in hiring
  • How feedforward works and why words matter when looking for opportunities to improve
  • How you can create a space where no topic is off-limit
  • How assessments can redeem their reputation and gain receptivity again

Remember, if you know a conscious leader or aspiring conscious leader who is committed to co-creating with other conscious leaders to turn ripples of positive change into waves of positive change, invite them to the C3 community.

And, if you haven’t yet, join us and introduce us to your expertise so that we can include it in our next topic survey.  Co-create with us and share the wealth of your knowledge, experience, and wisdom while you also benefit from the amazing leaders already in the group.

Leaders need each other right now! What support do you need? Ask me or the C3 community today.

Neil Young – Heart Of Gold

Live from 1971. Neil digs around in his pockets trying to find the right harp and then plays a new song…Heart of Gold.

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

A Recap of the Branding Masterclass for Conscious Leaders

Thank you so much to the folks who spent some time with me earlier this week in the Branding Masterclass for Conscious Leaders.

In just one hour, we covered the following:

  • What personal branding is and is not
  • How a powerful personal brand can make achieving professional goals easier and faster
  • Where to start and how to determine your outcome goals
  • How you can leverage your network to gain momentum even before your branding is complete
  • Where and how to promote your brand in ways that inspire others to act on your behalf
  • The often missing critical step of personal branding that limits results and wastes time
  • What branding points are, what they look like, and how they are used in my proprietary branding process as the foundation of all of your messaging and content

The replay is up in the C3 Community on LinkedIn. Please join us there if you aren’t already a member.

If there is someone you feel would benefit from this masterclass, please invite them to the C3 community to view the replay.

Please leave a comment if you watch the replay. I’d love your feedback.

Here are some ways you can follow up with me to take the next steps to use your brand to achieve your goals:

  • Schedule a call to see if the Conscious Leadership Certification and Conscious Leadership Trainer Certification available through the Corporate Conscious Ripple Blueprint is a fit for you: https://bit.ly/CLCCall
  • Schedule a call to learn more about Epic Careering one-on-one personalized career branding services: http://bit.ly/Freebrandcall
  • Schedule a call to explore how personal branding can help you align your team(s) with company culture, fortify teams, and enhance collaboration: http://bit.ly/EpicTalentBrand
  • Schedule a call to learn more about corporate/start-up branding to attract talent and target customers: http://bit.ly/EpicCoBrand

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

How to Go from a Boss to a Conscious Leader

Recently, I read a post from a business owner who was asking human resources professionals for advice about an employee who requested not to be contacted after work hours or on weekends, except in the event of an emergency. 

He explained that he “made it clear” to the employee that she is not required to respond to anything not urgent after hours or on weekends, but affirmed his “authority to send emails to their work email address for items that may cross his mind after hours so he doesn’t forget. He sent this employee an email over the weekend. She “politely and respectfully” reminded him of her request. “I really would like my time and space respected during off-hours.” He pushed back. She pushed back. 

“You may not like me setting boundaries but this is important to me. If you respected me and my time, you would understand that an employee should be allowed to have a reprieve.”

His perspective was: “As the boss and owner of the company, I should be the one who sets operations and not the employee… She is setting (or changing) the business guidelines and protocol, and it does not sit well with me.”

Many people advised this leader to let her walk, his way or the highway, and he was very much in agreement at the time I read and responded to his post. This advice and his source of discomfort were very much coming from ego rather than empathy. 

Here was my response: 

“Look, everyone is doing the best they can to cope in difficult times. This requires MORE self-care than ever. The only solution isn’t to send emails anyway because it works for you and she can just opt to ignore them. She obviously has notifications on to deal with emergencies, so she will get every email, and even though she may not be required to respond to non-emergencies, she still may feel compelled by a sense of duty and obligation that adds pressure (self-imposed, yes) when she needs to be disconnected. Need – as in, a physical need to manage stress for overall well being. By insisting on your way and not respecting her boundaries, you are communicating that what she needs is less important than what you want. Self-care = putting your needs over someone else’s wants. Selfish = putting your wants over someone else’s needs. What kind of leader do you want to be? Can’t you create the drafts when you think of them and send them off Monday morning? Yes. You can. If you don’t value her, let her go. If you do value her, respect her boundaries. Be the leader she needs.”

He responded, “Fair and well put.”

While he was in ego at the time of posting, he was also open to really hearing other ways to look at this problem. 

I’m not sure how he’ll handle it, but I am glad that he was open.

He said, “I want to do what is fair and just, which is why I came to this group! Thank you!!”

At that moment, this boss/manager had a choice to move into conscious leadership. He was able to do so because his intention was to be fair to his employee. He was open to guidance and new self-awareness, and if he does decide to accommodate his employee, he will have moved from ego to empathy and compassion, which is empathy in action.

As a leader, you have multiple points throughout their days, weeks, months, and years that give you the opportunity to make similar choices. 

Like forming any habit, and what I love about habits, is that once a habit is formed, doing that thing becomes a compulsion rather than a choice. You are pulled to do it, rather than having to push. However, that time in between the self-awareness of the habit that needs to develop and the time that the habit is developed, the push is a challenge for most people. 

Join me for a free online masterclass on Wednesday, September 30th at 2:00 PM EDT to find out more about how you can create more speed and ease during that in-between period so that you can become more consistently conscious as a leader.  

What would you have advised this leader to do? What would you do?

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If you’re dedicated to making a meaningful impact in the world through your work, I invite you to join my LinkedIn group for conscious leaders. Join C3 now to be a part of future free events, watch replay recordings of our past events, interact with the conscious community, speakers, and experts, and have your chance to share your expertise by becoming a future guest panelist for upcoming events. Remember that without you, meaningful change is not possible.

Dashboard Confessional – Bend And Not Break (Lyrics)

Lovely band, lovely song, lovely album Album: “A Mark, A Mission, A Brand, A Scar” – 2003 Lyrics: I catalog these steps now Decisive and intentioned precise …

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

If You Really Want to Build a Talent Community, Try These Tips

I first heard of talent communities circa 2012 from Mahe Bayireddi as he was founding Phenom People. Had I still been in recruiting at the time, I probably would have been all over it, as it seems like a great, easy way to pluck talent on demand that is already engaged with your brand. Having been trained in branding as a recruiter in 2005, it really would have aligned with what we were taught – to establish long-term relationships by being strong resources and adding unique value from our experience.

Perhaps, having had an entrepreneurial interest, I would have helped my firm launch a branding and talent community-building service for our clients. It might have helped my firm establish itself, but I’m skeptical that it would have really done anything to accelerate or improve hiring for most of our clients, and I’d like to explain why.

By 2012, I had been working with and for job seekers rather than companies (with a few exceptions.) When you see the hiring process from the candidate’s perspective, you realize candidates aren’t buying into this whole talent community thing.

Even though coaches like me have spent the last 20 years teaching corporate professionals to compile and research target employers and conduct a campaign that is proactive, the vast majority of candidates conduct reactive job searches. They look for job postings when they’re ready to change jobs and use the method that is immediately in front of them – applying through job boards.

Companies have traditionally favored recruiting talent from its competition, but it’s not great career management to jump ship because a company you vied to work for when you were looking is finally ready to hire.

Last week I attended Talent Experience Live, a live LinkedIn event hosted by Natalie McKnight and Devon Foster of Phenom People. The topic was talent communities, and Randy Goldberg, VP of Talent Acquisition Strategy at MGM, was also there to share tips.

I took the opportunity to ask these experts a couple of questions, such as how they measure success and which metrics they track. Goldberg advised running your talent community initiative combining engagement efforts with marketing best practices, such as using technology and segmented messaging.

So, using traditional marketing tools, they create various groups of talent, create tags, send customized e-mails to each group, A/B test various messages, and track the number of e-mail opens, along with the number of clicks on apply links. Using these tools, he said MGM has achieved an 80% open rate, which is amazing.

Building a talent community is not as simple as setting up some great automated tech and hiring some marketing people to post on social media or send out a company newsletter. You can do that, but ROI will escape you…unless…

Your company has already established its brand as an employer of choice. Admired companies and industry leaders like Disney, Google, Marriott, Apple, and MGM will be able to implement technology and marketing to build talent communities because they are on people’s radar as a place where they can work among the best and brightest. While marketing directly to people, they can also market to any number of startups or competitors.

If you really want to build a talent community, you have to first brand your company as an employer of choice. Your talent must be perceived as the best and the brightest, and your policies and culture as lifestyle-friendly.

One of the other questions I asked Goldberg was whether executive branding was part of their talent community strategy. He said that executives are doing more publishing and public speaking – keynotes, panels, podcasts, and live events (obviously), such as Talent Experience Live.

This is a great way to make your company superstars more accessible, but it’s just one small component of executive branding.

Executive branding is a multi-tiered strategy that, to be truly effective, will require you to brand at the macro AND micro-levels. Praise and promote your front line just as much as your C-Suite. Also, show your prospective talent that employees have an admirable lifestyle. Show them who they are outside of their company identity.

Goldberg had a good point about not sending e-mails from a “do not reply” e-mail address. Offer a channel for your audience to connect with a REAL person. This demonstrates great empathy with job seekers.

The other thing that your company will have to fine-tune if you are going to be successful at attracting future superstars to your candidate pool is the candidate experience. The experience MUST match the hype! Goldberg mentioned that MGM allows its talent community to interact with its alumni. That’s employer brand confidence.

This requires standard operating procedures followed by every stakeholder involved in hiring. This includes non-automated, HUMAN standardized follow-up protocols for candidates who interview, rolling out position status updates to applicants, transparent salary negotiations, and comprehensive onboarding and training. Acknowledge and fix what people complain about on Glassdoor.

Furthermore, your company had better offer opportunities for diverse, dynamic (hard + soft, professional + personal) development, be proactive about succession planning and development planning, and practice transparency in communications throughout the organization.

Do not invest in building a talent community until your employer, executive, and employee brand are solid!

When you do, think not just in terms of marketing metrics, but also make sure that you have a way to tie this campaign with time to hire and the quality of hires, because what good is attracting candidates already engaged with your brand if they don’t land and succeed.

Are you realizing that your company needs to develop its executive branding? Schedule a consultation today!

New Edition – Cool It Now (Official Video)

Revisit New Edition’s number 1 songs here: https://UMe.lnk.to/NewEditionNumberOnes Listen and follow the New Edition Best Of Playlist: https://UMe.lnk.to/New…

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

Mrs. Huller is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

What Is Conscious Leadership and Why Do We Need It NOW to Save Tomorrow?

Yesterday, Vishen Lakhiani spoke at an online “I Am The Change” event hosted by Lisa Nichols, my former coach. Vishen is responsible for birthing Epic Careering’s newest offer, the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint.

When I saw him speak in San Diego in August of 2017, he opened up the event by challenging everyone in the room to only have or work for a humanity+ business. He showed a video of Tom Chi, Google X Co-Founder, answering a futuristic question, the answer to which I don’t think most of humanity was ready to hear: if consciousness doesn’t outpace innovation, we will destroy ourselves.

We need good people at the top, making decisions and leading future leaders toward a better world – right now! I wrote about this even before COVID, even before George Floyd, even before Beirut.

More than ever, we need people RIGHT NOW to wake up, speak up, stand up, step up, and lead us all to rise up, as Lisa Nichols laid out in her 5-day virtual event.

Vishen quoted MLK yesterday, in perfect context for what is happening right now in our world:

Power without love is reckless and abusive, and love without power is sentimental and anemic. Power at its best is love implementing the demands of justice, and justice at its best is power correcting everything that stands against love.” ― Martin Luther King Jr.

The old models of leadership have failed, and are making way for new breeds of leadership. It might feel confusing, overwhelming, or trite, but don’t let it make you apathetic.

“Apathy is the enemy of democracy.” In other words, by being indifferent, you could end up giving all your power to whoever sees fit to use it.

Here’s a little cheat sheet of three of the leadership styles emerging to disrupt the oligarchy:

  • Situational Leader – Adapts leadership style to individuals
  • Servant Leader – Hires the best talent, gets out of their way, and makes sure that they have what they need to do what they do best
  • Conscious Leader – Answers the question, “What is for the highest good for all?” with acute self-awareness

All of these leadership styles require emotional intelligence, compassion, and ego-checking. They can also all be applied simultaneously; it’s not a “this or that” thing.

However, when applying situational leadership, watch out for people feeling as if you might be favoring one person over another with extra time.

With servant leadership, you have to balance taking full accountability for the performance of your team and setting strong accountability expectations so that you prepare your team members to become leaders who can step into your place.

With conscious leadership, you have to deal with your baggage. It’s hard work. You have to be committed to continually increasing your awareness of how your beliefs, insecurities, fears, and biases influence your impact and performance, how you are perceived, the decisions that you make, and the state of mind that you’re in.

“What is for the highest good?” seems like such a simple question, but when leaders are not all of the above, they may justify unconscious decisions. They may choose glory over good, or self-preservation over the preservation of company values.

In order to be conscious, leaders of today need better tools for leveraging data while integrating intuition into decision-making, managing conflict with compassion, and inspiring over convincing. They need to develop personally just as much, if not more, as they develop professionally.

If you feel there is much more you can contribute through your career if only you knew how to influence change

If you are concerned enough about the future to take action

If you want to be able to tell your kids and grandkids you did all you could to preserve a better world for them…

The time is now.

Alesso – Heroes (we could be) ft. Tove Lo

FOREVER – The Debut Album Available Now http://Ales.so/forever Featuring “Sweet Escape,” “Heroes” feat. Tove Lo, “Cool” feat. Roy English and more Follow Ale…

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Convincing vs. Inspiring Leadership

When it comes to change, convincing people is tricky territory.

If successful, you get what you want in the short-term, but if people go against their own instincts, concerns, or even expertise to buy in on your idea, plan, product, service, or initiative, they won’t cooperate with the same energy. In the end, they may become forces of inertia or resistance, or even sabotage. You may get people to suspend their doubts and concerns and act, but they may regret it later. Then, you lose them and anyone they might have brought with them forever.

Buyer’s remorse is usually due to having been convinced to buy something that may prove not to be the solution it was promised to be.

In the Courageous Leader 5-Day Challenge, we also talked about intimidation. It has been a primary tool of conventional leadership, though it hasn’t always been covert. Any form of discipline at a job can be considered intimidation. Holding someone’s job over their head is a form of intimidation. While it is necessary to let poorly performing employees go, it is also right to put them on a corrective action plan (PIP – Performance Improvement Plan) before doing so to give them a chance to redeem themselves. Yet, still, it is intimidation, just a less aggressive form.

So what’s wrong with intimidation? It’s counter-productive. When a person is focused on survival, their brain allocates more resources to that cause and takes resources away from higher cognitive functions, such as creativity, motivation, emotional intelligence, and problem-solving. This puts workplaces at higher risk for errors – ethical, work-related, communication-related, etc. This leads to increased risks and losses that you may not notice too well on a balance sheet, but are none-the-less areas where companies lose a lot.

(During the Courageous Leader 5-Day Challenge, we also talked about how intimidation can be completely on the receiving side. You can always watch the challenge replays available in C3 if you want to learn more about that conversation.)

The rise of servant leadership has transformed the idea of a boss generating team performance by giving orders into a model that flips the relationship upside-down. The boss is there to hire the best talent, then essentially get out of their way, and remove any other obstacles to talent doing their best work. It turns the boss into an advocate in procuring resources that make working easier, and also creating conducive conditions to do so. This is not a bad model, but it does rely on talent to be self-motivated, self-accountable, and aligned with the corporate mission and purpose. If they are not, it also places the burden on the boss to be fully accountable for that. Additionally, it’s not a model without inherent risks, because without the leaders in this model holding individual team members accountable for their own performance AND engagement, entitlement ensues.

I have heard personal accounts from so many professionals and executives over the years about their workplaces. I’ve found that the companies that are reviewed the highest by my clients, prospects, and contacts have clear and compelling missions and values, and they intertwine them into everything that they do – how they make decisions, what they invest in, and what is prioritized in their workflows. It becomes a litmus test, and something that empowers employees to make decisions without needing approval. Doing this inspires aligned engagement, which is a much more fortified, resilient type of engagement – the kind needed during times like these.

Inspiring is different. You achieve inspiration when you demonstrate alignment with what the collective highest-self values are, and when you mitigate fears by validating them and demonstrating how fears and concerns will be addressed.

First, you have to find out what the values and the fears are. For that, you need psychological safety.

How do you create psychological safety? Attend Tuesday’s Answer the Call to Conscious Leadership event and hear from Rebecca Morgan, Psychological Safety expert, and best-selling author. Gain access to this event by joining the C3: Corporate Consciousness Co-op group.

Take her Psychological Safety survey to see how your company is doing.

Foo Fighters – Times Like These (Official Music Video)

Foo Fighters’ official music video for ‘Times Like These’. Click to listen to Foo Fighters on Spotify: http://smarturl.it/FooFSpotify?IQid=FooFTLT As feature…

Karen Huller, author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days (bit.ly/GetFocusIn30), is founder of Epic Careering, a 13-year-old leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, as well as JoMo Rising, LLC, a workflow gamification company that turns work into productive play. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. 

Karen was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends in hiring and careering. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She is an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and previously was an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is also an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy where some of her students won the 2018 national competition, were named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

 

Racial Injustice, Economic Injustice, Health Injustice

It’s funny how coincidences work, isn’t it?

I ordered the 2nd edition of The B Corp Handbook to see how it was augmented with new case studies of companies that profit, thrive, and grow, all while doing good in the world.

I usually force myself to read prologues, forewords, and introductions because, even though I’m anxious to dig right in, I often find there are critical context and additional resources in these sections that can exponentially increase the value that I get from a book, and this edition was no exception.

Co-author Ryan Honeyman seemed to anticipate some backlash from B Corp prospects on the diversity and inclusion focus of the new edition, justifying that you can’t really have a company that does good in the world without acknowledging how racial injustices impact economic, social, and environmental injustices; they are directly correlated.

In light of the events of the week (#GeorgeFloyd), and unfortunately too many weeks before that (#AhmaudArbery, #CentralParkKaren, just to name a couple), it seems more like a sign than coincidence that this was the focus of the introduction, but it was the way Honeyman seemed to need to justify its inclusion that bothered me.

When I was in college, I was told by someone who shall remain nameless, but who was a very influential person in my life, that I should despise affirmative action, because it meant that even if I was qualified for a job, a [person of color] would get it just to make the numbers look better.

Why were the numbers so bad, was my response. Their reply – including blatant racism, lack of empathy and understanding, and justifications – reinforced that, while this person will always be in my life and I cherish them, I cannot possibly adopt their world view, and I became a skeptic of theirs ever since. It wasn’t until years later that I became a recruiter and found myself challenging my own biases while also being exposed to others’, that I became a stronger advocate, and in a position to do so, for equality in the workplace. It was…. messy, though.

I’m excited to dig more into this edition of The B Corp Handbook, but today I wanted to share just a few of the wisdom bombs within the introduction because they directly correlate to what is happening right now before our eyes.

The other co-author, Dr. Tiffany Jana, is the representative voice of diversity in this book. I think it’s only fair to start with her wisdom:

  • “If we fail to leverage our collective economic power to address what we can clearly see our gross injustices– economic, Environmental, social, medical, educational, and more– then are we really walking the walk?”
  • “There are no perfect role models for DEI. The important thing is to acknowledge your error, apologize whenever possible, and be more present and intentional next time.”
  • “Equity… means everyone gets treated according to their individual needs or circumstances.”
  • “If you use people as tools to get work done but don’t engage their minds and hearts, that is not inclusion. If people’s opinions are not sought out, taken seriously, or at the pond, that is not inclusion. Inclusion is sharing the work, and the opportunities, the glory, the fun, and the failure.”
  • “In order to restore trust in business, the business community needs to respond to those people’s legitimate desire for jobs with dignity the business community also needs to make the case that economic justice for all isn’t inextricably tied to, and dependent on, social and environmental justice.”
  • “Companies that thrive on the exploitation of people should not thrive.”

Quotes from Mr. Ryan Honeyman:

  • “It’s should not be the burden of people of color, women, or other marginalized groups to educate folks with privilege about institutional racism, institutional sexism, and other forms of systemic bias.”
  • “If you choose to walk away from an uncomfortable conversation, you are exercising your privilege, because people of color, women, and others cannot walk away from their identity.”
  • “White supremacy is the system that perpetuates many of the problems our diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives are attempting to solve.”
  • “I had never considered that challenging and unraveling the norms, assumptions, and culture of white supremacy is self could be part of the solution.”
  • “Only by naming it, disrupting it, and dismantling it can we successfully create an economy that works for the benefit of all life.”

I invite you to consider Mindfulness Training and Emotional Intelligence (MT/EQ) training for your company and/or team. When applied correctly, over 200 studies prove that MT/EQ helps companies control profit bleeding by contributing to improved problem solving, enhanced motivation, higher performance and productivity, and more while also helping to replace bias/discrimination, corruption, workplace drama, harassment with consciousness and kindness.

What are your thoughts on how to promote diversity and inclusion in the workplace?

Natalie Merchant – Break Your Heart

Music video directed by Sophie Muller, featuring N’Dea Davenport and filmed at The Chelsea Hotel in NYC.

Karen Huller, author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days (bit.ly/GetFocusIn30), is founder of Epic Careering, a 13-year-old leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, as well as JoMo Rising, LLC, a workflow gamification company that turns work into productive play. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. 

Karen was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends in hiring and careering. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She is an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and previously was an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is also an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy where some of her students won the 2018 national competition, were named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

Who Has Guts Like Tim Bray?

While many companies are stepping up to pivot their resources toward initiatives that benefit society during this COVID crisis, there are some companies coming under fire for not doing enough.

*Uh-hem. Amazon.*

Ooh. Excuse me. Allergies.

I don’t usually call out companies individually by name, though I tend to notice and write a lot about trends. Furthermore, if a trend either has promise as a solution or a detriment, I tend to do something about it. That’s me. And, that’s Tim Bray.

Tim Bray, however, had one of the most prestigious jobs out there for a tech guy. As VP and Distinguished Engineer at Amazon Web Services, Tim was kicking ass and having fun, but he also saw the bigger picture.

He saw Amazon as “a company that understands the importance of thinking big, taking ownership of hard problems, and earning trust.”

Amazon’s own vision is “to be Earth’s most customer-centric company.” The argument was made that if Amazon wants to maintain its customer base, it should really look out for its well-being long-term. Sounds logical.

On May 1st, Tim said goodbye to his fun job, his valued colleagues, and what may add up to about $1M.

How many people would do that?

Amazon will survive Tim Bray’s departure, as will Tim Bray. In fact, within a week of the news breaking, he was scouted by Google, Comcast, Huawei, and “a bunch of startups.” He’s received 2,256 LinkedIn invitations. He helped build the internet, and he’s got quite a following of people now who would work under him in a heartbeat. To be fair, he had quite a fanbase of people who followed him and his career well before this, but he’s not looking for a job.

In a CBC interview, Bray notes how there was a time not too long ago when the tech sector was hero-worshipped – looked to as the potential panacea for our everyday pains. How far it has fallen is the point he makes.

And he doesn’t consider it an Amazon problem or a Jeff Bezos problem. Actually, Bezos did give $100M to Feeding America and Amazon has purchased 100,000 electric delivery vans. Amazon has also devised a plan and made a pledge to run on 100% renewable energy by 2030 and net-zero carbon by 2040, and has spent an estimated $1B to improve safety and conditions for warehouse employees. These are direct requests made in the open letter sent to Jeff Bezos and the Board of Directors of Amazon in 2019 by over 8,700 Amazon employees.

We need to draw a clear line for corporate conduct. That doesn’t mean deciding for once and for all what is “good” and “bad”, because we will never agree on that. Right now, it can seem like the line between right and wrong – and even true and false – is gone! It’s not even grey.

How much money does one man need, anyway?

Bezos needs quite a fortune to realize his next vision – people working and living in space. Has he already given up on this planet? Perhaps. Does he know something we don’t, or is he actually reading the writing on the wall more clearly?

I’m going to do something foolish and assume that the people who can live in Jeff Bezos’ space future will not be the frontline workers of Amazon or Whole Foods.

So let’s give companies, especially large powerful ones, a clear benchmark – a blueprint. Let’s move the needle toward neutral to balance profit/power and people/planet. We can restore balance – just as nature does. If we hurt nature, we hurt ourselves. Do you know what else we hurt? People who could be our customers and employees in the future. And for what?

“Our whole economy is focused on growth and efficiency, and the stress and strain on the people at the bottom of the pyramid just doesn’t bear enough weight in that equation.” ~ Tim Bray

There are numerous pivotal topics surrounding Bray’s recent high-profile departure:

  • Economic inequity
  • The problem of making things more efficient while putting undue strain on front-line workers
  • Automation vs. preserving jobs
  • Worker protection laws in the US versus the rest of the world (the latter of which is apparently holding Amazon to higher standards)
  • A company’s responsibility to commit to reducing their carbon footprint
  • The people who take the most risk are the ones who ensure profit, so protect them

All of these are highly relevant topics I’d like to dig into with some depth in the future. For right now, I want to focus on this:

Bray’s resignation was not really about Amazon’s efforts (or lack thereof) to keep workers safe or protect the planet. It was about the firing of the whistleblowers. It was about the message that it sent to employees at Amazon and, really, everywhere, that your job is not safe if you speak up, particularly if you speak out against your company.

These are all things I would really like to know:

  • Could the activists have done a better job of recognizing the efforts already made? Could they have used better channels? Could they have still been successful if they’d have kept their efforts internal, and in turn, could that have saved their jobs?
  • Could Amazon have done a better job of communicating their intentions and efforts, which, like all companies, had to keep up with shifting and evolving guidelines?
  • Could Tim Bray, who used the “proper channels” to make known his complaints and concerns about the firing of whistleblowers have done something differently to influence another outcome?
  • Could the company have been clearer with the activists? Could they have created even more defined guidelines on how to raise and elevate shared concerns about environmental corporate policy?

I think it’s important for ALL of us to know the answers to these questions so that we can do better. Tim Bray – I know you are drowning in your inbox right now, but I’d really like to help you make your sacrifice be the ripple that creates waves of conscious change!

The last thing I want to do is put leaders’ jobs in jeopardy, especially in this economy, if they don’t know how to successfully influence positive change. At the same time, in any negotiation, you have to be willing to walk away, or you hold zero power.

I know there are not many people who would leave $1M on the table to protest wrongdoings. There aren’t many people who would leave $1M on the table to be able to look themselves in the mirror, but I’m looking for these people RIGHT NOW.

I’m looking for the highly employable leaders, who trust that if they can’t effectuate change using proven protocols for doing so, they will be able to find (or start) another company where they can thrive, spread their conscious leadership wings, succeed, earn a comfortable executive salary, and look themselves in the mirror each day. They will be able to look their kids and grandkids in the eyes and say with conviction that they are doing all they can!

So, who has guts like Tim Bray?

The Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint is a yearlong personal and professional development program that focuses on expanding your power of intention and influence over self, team, and organization.

We promise – if you can’t create conscious change where you are after 18 weeks, we will help you land a new, better position where you can!

Is this you? Reach out today!

Big Balls

Provided to YouTube by Sony Music Entertainment Big Balls · AC/DC Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap ℗ 1976 J. Albert & Son Pty Ltd Released on: 1976-12-17 Guitar, …

Karen Huller, author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days, is founder of Epic Careering, a 13-year-old leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, as well as JoMo Rising, LLC, a workflow gamification company that turns work into productive play. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. 

Karen was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends in hiring and careering. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She is an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and previously was an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is also an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy where some of her students won the 2018 national competition, were named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award.